Amethyst

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Birthstone - Amethyst is the Birthstone for February

Anniversary - Amethyst jewellery is often given to mark a 6th Wedding Anniversary

Gemstone Family - Quartz

Mohs' scale - 6.5-7.5 (The Mohs' scale 1 to 10 indicates a gem's scratch hardness, with 10 Mohs the hardest)

Colours - Amethyst ranges from light mauve to deep purple

Amethyst is a crystalline quartz and comes in all shades of purple, from light lavender amethyst to the intense Siberian amethyst that displays highlights of magenta when faceted (the name Siberian is used for any rich purple material, regardless of origin). A deep uniform purple colour is more expensive than the pale lavenders. The stone is dichroic and shows a bluish or reddish purple tinge when looked at from different angles. It is usually faceted as a mixed or a step cut and has distinctive inclusions which can look like feathers, thumb prints or tiger stripes. Amethyst jewellery was particularly popular in the late 19th century. In tradition amethyst is thought to guard against drunkenness. When in its presence it is thought to instil a serious and sober mind. When heat treated the purple amethyst changes to yellow, producing the gem citrine. Crystals that are part amerthyst and part citrine and called ametrine. For pale stones placing foil behind them can enhance colour and poor quality amethysts can be tumbled to make pretty beads.

A few interesting facts about Amethyst

In tradition amethyst is thought to guard against drunkenness. When in its presence it is thought to instil a serious and sober mind. The name is said to derive from the Greek word ‘amethystos,’ which translates loosely as ‘not drunken’.

For pale stones placing foil behind them can enhance colour and poorer quality amethysts can be tumbled to make pretty beads.